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Saturday, July 14, 2012

tooth fusion vs Concrescence vs gemination

Tooth fusion

 

 The phenomenon of tooth fusion arises through union of two normally separated tooth germs, and depending upon the stage of development of the teeth at the time of union, it may be either complete or incomplete. On some occasions, two independent pulp chambers and root canals can be seen. However, fusion can also be the union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ. In these cases, the number of teeth is fewer if the anomalous tooth is counted as one tooth. In geminated teeth, division is usually incomplete and results in a large tooth crown that has a single root and a single canal. Both gemination and fusion are prevalent in primary dentition, with incisors being more affected.

 

Concrescence

 

 Concrescence is a condition of teeth where the cementum overlying the roots of at least two teeth join together. The cause can sometimes be attributed to trauma or crowding of teeth. Surgical separation of the teeth may be necessary if one is to be extracted.

 

Tooth gemination

 

 Tooth gemination is a dental phenomenon that appears to be two teeth developed from one. There is one main crown with a cleft in it that, within the cervical third of the crown, looks like two teeth, though it is not two teeth. The number of the teeth in the arch will be normal.The phenomenon of gemination arises when two teeth develop from one tooth bud and, as a result, the patient has an extra tooth, in contrast to fusion, where the patient would appear to be missing one tooth. Fused teeth arise through union of two normally separated tooth germs, and depending upon the stage of development of the teeth at the time of union, it may be either complete or incomplete. On some occasions, two independent pulp chambers and root canals can be seen. However, fusion can also be the union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ. In these cases, the number of teeth is also normal and differentiation from gemination may be very difficult, if not impossible. In geminated teeth, division is usually incomplete and results in a large tooth crown that has a single root and a single canal. Both gemination and fusion are prevalent in primary dentition, with incisors being more affected.

 

 

 

 

1 comment:

  1. It is an interesting case. I should ask my chandler dentist about it as well. Thank you for your blog. Have a nice day.

    ReplyDelete

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